Processes

Plant hexcellence™ – Processes

This is the third installment of six in the Plant Hexcellence exploration journey. The first two articles addressing both the “People” and the “Plant” cells with the corresponding facets.

All of the cells are interrelated and that is what brings the Asset Management strategy full circle, but there are some facets that need to be discussed specifically and how they interrelate. We will be talking about Policy & Procedure in the next issue, but Processes have so much inter-dependency with that cell that it requires a brief discussion now. A Policy is a document set in place to create governance of a situation. A procedure is how personnel will execute accordingly to meet that governance. A process is the graphical representation, map or decision tree of the actual method to accomplish the procedure supporting the policy.

So what are work processes?

DEFINITION = A visual representation of Work depicted in ow diagrams. They demonstrate a mapped chronological path or alternate paths that are taken to accomplish a specific task. See Figure 1.

Figure 1
Figure 1

They are also called Work- ow maps. Which processes should be mapped and which ones re we talking about relating to Asset Management? What is the importance of mapping the process?

When you take the time to map the process, it ives the end users the chance to look at:

  1. What actually occurs accomplishing the task (AS-IS).
  2. What could be the more/most efficient path (TO-BE).
  3. Whether there are alternate paths or methods to accomplish the task.
  4. What information must be available in order to make a decision to move to the next box/figure in the map.
  5. What functionality is required by the work management system in order to follow the path or procedure?
  6. Verification for regulatory documentation of a specific path to meet the governance of the policy.
  7. Ability to assign roles and responsibilities specific to the tasks within the diagram.

The following section is an excerpt from Robert Boehringer, Vice President, Orion Development Group.

To effectively visually represent a process, these critical dimensions should be included:

  1. Who.
  2. What.
  3. When.
  4. Where.
  5. Whether.
  6. What Degree (how much).
  7. What Frequency (how often).

It sounds a little bit like “Journalism 101,” and that’s the point. Tell a visual story about your process and all possible solutions. When you add these dimensions you develop interesting characters and sub-plots which captivate your audience.

Who

Who does the work? Who authorizes the work? Who hands-o the work? Who verifies or changes the work? Keep asking who until you have considered all the stakeholders – the suppliers, the owners, the customers, the community, the employees, and the regulators (acronym: SOCCER). The “who” dimension shows opportunities to transfer work “to” or “from” your customer in order to simplify your process. Good map formats for this dimension include the Responsibility Matrix and the Swim Lane chart.

What

What work is being done? What work is not being done? What value-added transformation is happening, or what non-value-added work occurs due to functional silos? What waste occurs – rework or mistakes? The “what” dimension acts as the “verb” in your process map. Good map formats for this dimension include the Top Down, the Logic Flow, the Flow Process chart, the Swim Lane or the State Change Chart.

When

When is work done? Is it relatively before or after an event? Or does it occur on an ad-hoc basis? The “when” dimension provides movement, flow, or a feeling of a series of events. When work is happening serially, and you display it that way, you might find an opportunity to take advantage of parallelism – redesigning the work to happen at the same time. Good map formats for this dimension include the Logic Flow, the Work Flow Diagram and the Swim Lane chart.

Where

Where is the work accomplished, physically? Which building, cubicle, floor, state, country, or area? The “where” dimension provides co-location opportunities which simplifies work flow. Good map formats for this dimension include the Work Flow Diagram and the Swim Lane chart.

Whether

Is this work that must be done or is it “nice to have?” What triggers this work being done? Someone or something determines whether or not to do the work. Seek to eliminate non-value-added intermediaries where decisions to do the work are separate from the participants who do it. In a simple process the “whether” decision is made by process performers. The unneeded complexity can be simplified by evaluating the “whether” dimension. Good map formats for this dimension include the Top Down chart, the Logic Flow, the Flow Process chart and the State Change chart.

What degree (How much)

How much of the process can one participant accomplish? What are the boundaries – in skill or in authorization? How much work needs to be done to achieve acceptable level of performance? The “what degree” dimension reveals excessive standardization without regard for the participants involved. One solution includes using specialists in a team with broader responsibilities, thus simplifying the entire process. Another solution includes adding a caseworker between extreme specialists, to simplify customer service. Good map formats for this dimension include the Top Down, the Cycle vs. Process Time, the Flow Process Chart, and the Work Flow diagram.

What frequency (How often)

How often is the work happening? What triggers the work – time passing or completion of another activity? The “what frequency” dimension reveals the “80/20 rule”: 80 percent of the time normal activities occur, but in the 20 percent of the time when exceptions occur, we spend 80 percent of our effort resolving. This dimension reveals your exceptions. Good map formats for this dimension include the Top Down, the Logic Flow, the Work Flow and the Cycle vs. Process chart. (Process Management Memory Jogger, Robert Boehringer).

As it relates to Asset Management, some, but not all the processes that should be mapped include:

Operations

Start up and Shut down. – More damage and equipment failure occurs during poorly executed start up and shut down than any other time.

Asset management

  • Work – Any and all work related to equipment and facilities maintenance in the most e cient and e ective manner.
  • Work Identification Work Planning Work Scheduling Work Assignments Work Execution.
  • Work – Any and all work related to equipment and facilities maintenance in the most efficient and effective manner.
  • Work Identification.
  • Work Planning.
  • Work Scheduling.
  • Work Assignments.
  • Work Execution.
  • Work Close out/ Audit.
  • Parts – All inventory of MRO related parts to include consumables in the operational process.
  • Parts requisition.
  • Parts ordering.
  • Parts purchasing.
  • Parts being pulled from inventory.
  • Kitting of parts for work scheduled.
  • Adding parts to inventory as a permanent spare Max/ Min quantity and method of calculation Receipt of parts.
  • Inventory Cycle Counts tied to ABC methodology.
  • Regulatory Affairs.
  • Management of Change.
  • Permitting.
  • Hazardous work review.

In summary, we have already addressed the People Cell (who executes the work), the Plant Cell (what work must be done and what to do it upon) and now Processes (how to execute the work). Stay tuned next issue to look at Policy & Procedures.

Autor: Scott Kelley, CMRP
Managing Director
c: 713.962.1978
Mail: scottkelley@geometricreliability.com

0 comentarios

Enviar un comentario

Tu dirección de correo electrónico no será publicada. Los campos obligatorios están marcados con *

Edición 29 Predictiva21

ver todas las ediciones

Suscríbete a Predictiva21

Síguenos en Linkedin

Sistemas de Indicadores (KPI) para Evaluar la Gestión del Mantenimiento

  • Sistemas de medición del desempeño en mantenimiento
  • Balanced scorecard y la gestión de mantenimiento
  • Indicadores técnicos de mantenimiento
  • Overall equipment effectiveness (OEE) y el mantenimiento
  • Indicadores de la SMRP y de la EFNMS- en 15341
  • Sistema jerárquico-funcional de indicadores para mantenimiento

Taller de Análisis de Criticidad (Detección de Oportunidades)

  • Fundamentos del Análisis de Criticidad
  • Pasos para la realización de un Análisis de Criticidad
  • Modelos Cuantitativos
  • Modelos Cualitativos
  • Modelos Probabilisticos
  • Selección de Matriz de Criticidad

Fundamentos Técnicos de Tribología y Lubricación

  • Conocer los fundamentos de tribología y lubricación, así como su uso y aplicación.
  • Importancia de la Lubricación para mejorar la confiabilidad en los procesos.
  • Conocer características de los diferentes productos empleados en lubricación y criterios de uso.
  • Conocimientos para facilitar un proceso de cambio en el enfoque de mantenimiento.
  • Identificar el vinculo Mantenimiento-Lubricación-Diseño.
  • Identificar que una adecuada Lubricación contribuye en ahorrar energía y reduce costos.

Auto Evaluación de Mantenimiento

  • Formación del Comité de Análisis y Diagnostico.
  • Establecimiento de parámetros para evaluar el mantenimiento.
  • Elaboración y aplicación de cuestionarios.
  • Principios y reglas de investigación eficaz.
  • Grado de madurez del área de mantenimiento.
  • Establecimiento da la Matriz de Esfuerzos versus Impacto.

Análisis de Costo de Ciclo de Vida LCC

  • Comprender la teoría del Análisis del Costo del Ciclo de Vida acorde a las normas ISO 15663 y UNE EN 60300-3-3 para la selección de alternativas económicas.
  • Evaluar el impacto económico de la Confiabilidad y de la Mantenibilidad en los costos de ciclo de vida de un equipo industrial.
  • Identificar los puntos de atención, barreras y debilidades relacionados con la utilización de las técnicas de Análisis del Costo del Ciclo de Vida y Evaluación Costo Riesgo Beneficio.
  • Determinar la Vida Útil Económica para decidir cuándo es el momento oportuno para reemplazar un activo físico instalado en una planta industrial.

Gestión y Optimización de Inventarios para Mantenimiento

  • Aspectos claves en gestión de inventarios
  • Clasificación de inventarios en mantenimiento
  • Análisis de Criticidad jerarquización de repuestos
  • Cantidad económica de Pedido
  • Indicadores en la Gestión de Inventarios

Generación de Planes Óptimos de Mantenimiento Centrado en Confiabilidad RCM

  • Fundamentos del MCC
  • Desarrollo del MCC
  • Beneficios del MCC
  • Desarrollo del AMEF
  • Generación de Planes de Mantenimiento

Planificación, Programación y Costos de Mantenimiento

  • Modelo de la Gestión de Mantenimiento
  • Sistemas indicadores de la Gestión
  • Planificación del Mantenimiento
  • El sistema de Orden de Trabajo
  • Análisis de Mantenibilidad
  • Programación del Mantenimiento

Técnicas de Análisis de Fallas y Solución de Problemas a través del Análisis de Causa Raíz RCA

  • Fundamentos del falla
  • Modos de falla
  • Tipos de falla
  • Análisis Causa Raiz
  • Tipos de ACR
  • Aplicación de ACR con Árbol Logico
  • Jerarquización de Problemas
  • Desarollo de Hipótesis
  • Evaluación de resultados

Análisis de Confiabilidad, Disponibilidad y Mantenibilidad (RAM)

  • Definiciones y conceptos.
  • Relación de un análisis RAM con la vida del activo.
  • Información requerida para realizar un análisis RAM.
  • Etapas para efectuar un análisis RAM.
  • Construcción del modelo en el análisis RAM.
  • Ajuste de distribuciones de probabilidad.
  • Incorporación de la opinión de experto.
  • Combinación de fuentes (Teorema de Bayes).
  • Simulación Montecarlo.
  • Análisis de Resultados.
  • Jerarquización de activos según criticidad.

Mantenimiento Productivo Total (TPM)

  • Evolución del mantenimiento.
  • Objetivos del TPM.
  • Eficiencia operacional global.
  • Pilares de sustentación del TPM.
  • Implementación del TPM.
  • Evaluación de la eficacia de los equipos.
  • Control administrativo (Las 5 S – housekeepig).

Introducción a la Confiabilidad Operacional

  • Los fundamentos de confiabilidad, así como su uso y aplicación.
  • Visión de Confiabilidad Operacional como estrategia para mejorar la confiabilidad en los procesos
  • Conocimientos para facilitar un proceso de cambio del enfoque de mantenimiento hacia un enfoque de Confiabilidad Operacional, que apunta hacia la reducción sistemática en la ocurrencia de fallas o eventos no deseados en los Sistemas.
  • Obtener criterios para aplicar la estrategia de Confiabilidad Operacional.
  • El diseño de estrategias y la selección de acciones técnicamente factibles y económicamente rentables en minimizar la ocurrencia de fallas.

Mantenimiento por Condición para Equipos Estáticos y Dinámicos (Mantenimiento Predictivo)

  • Mantenimiento por monitoreo de condición
  • Estimación de intervalos P-F
  • Costo riesgo beneficio
  • Planes de Monitoreo de Condición

Mantenibilidad y soporte a la Confiabilidad Operacional

  • Conocer conceptos que soportan el enfoque de Mantenibilidad.
  • Importancia de la Mantenibilidad para mejorar la confiabilidad en los procesos.
  • Entender y comprender los factores que influyen y afectan la Mantenibilidad en las operaciones.
  • Diferenciar función y funcionalidad para aplicar mejoras.
  • Identificar que una adecuada valoración de Mantenibilidad permite aumentar la rentabilidad.
  • Identificar el vinculo Mantenibilidad-Disponibilidad.
  • Mantenibilidad y los factores: personales, condicionales, del entorno organizacional y ambientales.

Análisis de Vibración Nivel I

  • Fundamentos de las vibraciones Mecánicas
  • Características de la vibración
  • Tipos de medición de vibración
  • Posición para medir vibración
  • Sistemas de monitoreo continuo y portátiles de vibración
  • Criterios para la selección de un sistema de medición y/o protección de vibración

Aplicación de la Norma ISO 14224 en sistemas CMMS para gestión de Activos

  • Protocolos para definición del Plan de Mantenimiento
  • Plan de Mantenimiento
  • Estándar Internacional ISO-14224
  • Sistemas de información para Gestión de Mantenimiento – CMMS
  • Administración de información de mantenimiento.
  • Limites jerárquicos de los equipos
  • Equivalencia taxonómica SAP-PM e ISO-14224.

Estándares de Planeamiento y Control de Mantenimiento

  • Formación del Comité de Análisis y Diagnostico.
  • Establecimiento de parámetros para evaluar el mantenimiento.
  • Elaboración y aplicación de cuestionarios.
  • Principios y reglas de investigación eficaz.
  • Grado de madurez del área de mantenimiento.
  • Establecimiento da la Matriz de Esfuerzos versus Impacto.

Administración del Mantenimiento

  • Identificación de los Activos.
  • Planificación y programación de mantenimiento
  • Plan / Programa maestro de mantenimiento
  • Las órdenes de trabajo, su evolución y metodologías de generación y recolección de registros
  • Los registros de materiales
  • Recolección de Datos de Mantenimiento

Gestión de Mantenimiento

  • Identificación de los Activos.
  • Planificación y programación de mantenimiento
  • Plan / Programa maestro de mantenimiento
  • Las órdenes de trabajo, su evolución y metodologías de generación y recolección de registros
  • Los registros de materiales
  • Recolección de Datos de Mantenimiento